13 Comments

Tax the CO2 emitted and regulate particulate emissions like any other source of particulate emissions and let the coal plant owners decide for themselves to close it.

Expand full comment
Aug 28Liked by Katharine Hayhoe

The percentage of coal as a source for electricity generation in the U.S. decreased from 52% to 19% between 2000 and 2020. It was replaced by natural gas and renewables. This change corresponded to a 40% reduction in CO2 emissions. Ref. https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/interactive/2023/clean-energy-electricity-sources/?itid=sf_climate_climate-lab_article_list. The last coal plants in NM are scheduled to retire in 2031.

Expand full comment
Aug 30Liked by Katharine Hayhoe

I'm sad to report that the UK's Green Deal is no longer, in fact it only survived from its launch in 2012 until 2015 when the government scrapped it. The theory behind it was quite good: initially an assessor would survey the property and put forward a set of energy efficiency/renewable energy improvements that would have reasonable payback times. These would then be funded through a loan which would be repaid through future electricity bills, with a "notional" guarantee that the loan payments would be less than the energy financial savings. However the programme had some fundamental flaws which have been summarised in the following article: https://energypost.eu/uk-green-deal-failed-needs-replacement/

Unfortunately the government has yet to come up with an alternative plan, so the UK is not in a good place when it comes to upgrading its existing housing stock.

Expand full comment

In Canada we have launched a program to help and support Canadians to reduce their household emissions including in their homes entitled Live Net Zero - LiveNetZero.org Last year we reached 54 million impressions and engaged 6.4 million Canadians in our program. We would love to have you speak with the families actively undertaking efforts to live a Net Zero lifestyle. If you are interested let us know how we might connect!

Expand full comment

Electrification of ones home is only for the privileged. The Kw ain't cheap folks and either is electrification of ones home. Takes lots of money to do so. We spends our tax dollars on forever wars ehick make some very wealthy folks wealthier while the rest slide down rung or two on the economic scale.

*Taking green and walking green...got to have $$$$ to walk the talk.*

Cheers

Expand full comment

I’d like to add a comment about switching from a gas stove to induction stove but are reluctant to because gas stoves have such fast and precise heat control. I bought an induction stove about six months ago and love it. Pot and pans reach cooking temperature very fast and if the temperature needs to be adjusted it happens very quickly and precisely. Only the bottom of the cookware gets hot so spills are a breeze to clean up and the kitchen gets heated much less. Any magnetic cookware works with them. When I got my induction stove I bought a reasonably priced set of cookware from Amazon. Induction stoves are a better way to cook.

Expand full comment

Thanks for the shoutout about how we're helping homeowners decarbonize at QuitCarbon!

Most people probably don't know that heating water accounts for 49% of home fossil fuel use, followed by space heating (37%) and cooking (7%). Putting in a heat pump water heater is often the best first step, and it's increasingly cheaper than fossil fuel gas between the rebates and the ongoing energy savings (especially if you also have solar)!

Heat pumps are remarkable machines, and will be a key part of the energy transition.

Expand full comment